10.0.0.0.1 and 10.0.0.1 Router IPs

If we had to describe what the 10.0.0.0.1 is with just one word, we would say that it’s wrong. Why? Because it’s actually supposed to be 10.0.0.1. People get the two IP addresses mixed up because they look very similar to each other and because they don’t know that IP addresses consist of four eight-bit numbers.

The 10.0.0.1 IP Address


The 10.0.0.1 IP address is special because it can be used more than once It belongs to the 24-bit block of private IP address, which are used for local area networks (LANs). Unlike public IP addresses, it’s not possible to route private IP addresses through the internet, but that doesn’t make them useless.

In fact, we can thank private IP addresses such as 10.0.0.1 for the fact that the internet as we know it hasn’t collapsed yet. There are approximately 4 billion IP addresses in the IPv4 communications protocol, which is one of the core protocols of standards-based internet-working methods in the internet, and the first regional Internet Registry run out of freely allocated IPv4 addresses on 15 April 2011.

Since then, network administrators and internet providers have been relying on various methods of remapping one IP address space into another and using private IP addresses such as 10.0.0.1 as substitutes for public IP addresses.

Eventually, the IPv4 communications protocol will be entirely replaced by its successor, Internet Protocol Version 6, or IPv6 for short, but that will take some time. Currently, only about 25 percent of internet traffic happens through IPv6.

How to Log in to 10.0.0.1?


If you have a router at home, there’s a good chance that you can access it using the 10.0.0.1 IP address:

  1. Open your favorite web browser and enter http://10.0.0.1 login page. If you see a security warning, try https://10.0.0.1 login instead.

    10.0.0.1

Please note! Double check that you’re not accessing the http://10.0.0.0.1 login page, which wouldn’t work because 10.0.0.0.1 login page doesn’t exist.

A login window should appear.

    Router’s admin panel login window
  1. Enter the default admin username and password to proceed.

    Router’s admin panel login If you don’t know what the default admin username and password combination are, proceed to the next chapter of this article.

  2. Explore your router’s admin panel.

  3. Router’s admin panel

Once you’re in your router’s admin page (keep in mind that the 10.0.0.0.1 admin page doesn’t exist because it contains one extra zero), you can change many different settings. You can even change the IP address of the login page.

You could, for example, change your Xfinity router login page or Comcast router login page from 10.0.0.1 Xfinity/10.0.0.1 Comcast to 10.0.4.1 or 10.125.3.1. As long as you stay between 10.0.0.0 and 10.255.255.255, you can use any IP address you want, so 10.0.0.0.1 Xfinity or 10.0.0.0.1 Comcast wouldn’t be possible.

When you change any Wi-Fi-related settings, we highly recommend you use NetSpot, an easy-to-use professional Wi-Fi analyzer designed to tell you everything you need to know about your wireless network, to see whether your change has had a positive effect.

Default Router Login and Password


Each router manufacturer uses different default username and password combinations. It’s far beyond the scope of this article to list all usernames and passwords you may encounter, so here are the top 10 most common username/password combinations:

Login Password
admin admin
admin password
admin [none]
[none] admin
[none] [none]
administrator password
administrator [none]
recovery recovery
root root
root [none]

If none of the 10 most common username/password combinations work, check the list of the default router passwords and usernames below:

What If You Can’t Connect to 10.0.0.1?


There are three main reasons why people have trouble connecting to 10.0.0.1:

  • No direct connection: For security reasons, most routers can be reached via the 10.0.0.1 IP address only from a computer they are directly connected to with an Ethernet cable. Some routers let you change this behavior, but most don’t. A decently long Ethernet cable won’t cost you much, and your desktop computer should already be equipped with an Ethernet port. If you only own a laptop, you can purchase a USB adapter for a couple of dollars on Amazon or in your local electronics store.

  • Wrong IP address: Even experienced network administrators sometimes type 10.0.0.0.1 instead of 10.0.0.1. Just keep in mind that all IPv4 IP addresses contain only four numbers, not five or six or ten. If you’ve changed the IP address of your router from 10.0.0.1 to something else but you don’t remember what, we recommend you restore your router to its default settings. There should be a restore button somewhere on the back of the router.

  • Wrong username and password: Routers are protected by a password to prevent strangers from changing your settings and possibly compromising your security. We list the most common username/password combinations below, but you should be able to find the default username and password written on a sticker located somewhere on your router.

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